Coronavirus Covid-19 Information

Since its inception, the Cardiology Department at St James’s Hospital has developed into a leading Irish cardiology centre that influences policy and practice by way of innovation and example. The Cardiology Department demonstrates excellence in the treatment and prevention of the acute and chronic sequelae of cardiovascular disease across clinical, educational and research streams at local and national levels. This excellence has prevailed and grown from the first major infrastructural expansion initiative in 1989 with the installation of two cardiac catheterisation laboratories and the opening of the current Coronary Care Unit.

The Cardiology Department in St James’s Hospital comprises of:

  • Cardiac Catheterisation Laboratories
  • Diagnostic Cardiology Department
  • Cardiac Rehabilitation
  • Daily outpatient clinics
  • Inpatient wards
  • Coronary Care Unit – nine-bedded unit
  • Robert Adams Ward - 31-bedded unit
  • The Cardiac Catheterisation Day Ward provides the following services;

    • 24/7 PPCI Service as part of the National Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) Programme
    • Coronary angiogram
    • PCI (Stent Insertion) +/- Rotablation/ FFR/ IVUS/ shockwave
    • Laser PCI
    • Cardiac biopsies
    • Right heart studies
    • Permanent pacemaker / ICD implant
    • Electrophysiology studies and cardiac ablation
    • Loop Recorder insertion/ removals
    • PFO/ASD/LAA closures
    • TOE (transoesophageal echocardiogram)
    • Cardioversion
    • TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve replacement)

    Contact Details:
    Cardiac Catheterisation Laboratory Coordinator
    Telephone: (01) 410 3550
    Email: CathLab@stjames.ie

    The Diagnostic Cardiology Department provides the following services:

    • Electrocardiogram (ECG)
    • 24hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
    • Holter monitoring (24hr, 48hr and 72hr)
    • Event recorder (7 day)
    • Exercise Stress Test ECG (EST)
    • Cardiac Implantable Device Clinic (Pacemaker, ICD, CRT and Loop)
    • Stress Echocardiography (Exercise and Dobutamine)
    • Echocardiography (Echo)
  • GPs can refer patients directly to the Cardiac Catheterisation Day Ward via:

    • Healthlink
    • Email: cathlab@stjames.ie
    • By post to: Cardiology Department, St James’s Hospital, James Street, Dublin 8.

    GPs can refer patients directly for an ECG via:

    Emergency referrals for the National ACS Programme

    Email: cathlab@stjames.ie
    Tel: (01) 416 2794

    For queries relating to Cardiac Catheterisation Day Ward scheduling:

    Email: cathlab@stjames.ie

    Tel: (01) 410 3550

    For queries relating to Diagnostic Cardiology scheduling:

    Email: diagnosticcardiology@stjames.ie

    Tel: (01) 416 2792 or (01) 416 2796

    If you require an interpreter for your procedure or consultation, please email or call us at least three working days before your appointment date.

  • An ECG is a non-invasive test that records the electrical activity of the heart. It is used to assess the rate, rhythm and electrical activity of the heart.

    An ECG takes about ten minutes to complete, with the recording of the heart rhythm itself only taking a few seconds.

    During a resting ECG, a physiologist will attach ten electrodes with adhesive pads to the skin of your chest, arms and legs. Once ready, you will lie flat on a treatment couch, while the computer creates a picture of the electrical impulses travelling through your heart.

  • An ambulatory blood pressure monitor is a non-invasive method to record your blood pressure at regular intervals over a 24-hour period.

    The test involves wearing a cuff around your upper arm which is connected to a small monitoring device worn on a belt. The cuff will automatically inflate at regular intervals throughout the 24-hour period. During the day this will be every 30 minutes, and every hour at night time.

    You will need to go about your normal activities while wearing the monitor. You will be asked to return the next day at a specified time to return the monitor.

    You must not bathe/ shower while wearing the monitor.

    You do not need to prepare for this test. Take all your medications as you would normally, unless your doctor tells you not to.

  • A holter monitor in a non-invasive method of recording your heart rhythm for a period of one to three days. The test involves wearing a small monitor which is worn around the neck and is attached to three electrodes on your chest.

    You will need to go about your normal activities while wearing the monitor. You will be asked to return the next day at a specified time to return the monitor.

    You must not bathe/ shower while wearing the monitor.

    You do not need to prepare for this test. Take all your medications as you would normally, unless your doctor tells you not to.

  • A cardiac event recorder is a non-invasive device that can be used to record your heart’s electrical activity when you have symptoms of an irregular heart rhythm.

    It records your heart rate and rhythm during a symptom (“event”). The monitor will take 15 minutes to attach. Electrodes are placed on your chest with the leads attached to a small recorder. These will record your heart rhythm. You will be given a diary to record any symptoms/ events while wearing the monitor.

    The monitor must be removed while bathing/ showering. You will be given spare electrodes and shown how to reattach the monitor.

    You will need to go about your normal activities while wearing the monitor. You will be asked to return the next day at a specified time to return the monitor.

    You do not need to prepare for this test. Take all your medications as you would normally, unless your doctor tells you not to.

  • An exercise stress test investigates how well your heart performs under increasing activity via exercise. It provides information on the causes of chest pain, arrhythmias and shortness of breath.

    Please wear loose clothing and comfortable walking shoes/ trainers suitable for walking on a treadmill. The test last for 30 minutes.

    You will first have electrodes placed on the chest, which are then connected via wires to an ECG monitor. The ECG charts your heart's electrical activity, including rate and rhythm, during the test. Before you start exercising, your resting heart rate will be measured and your blood pressure taken.

    You will then be asked to walk on a treadmill. The speed and incline of the treadmill will be gradually increased and you will be asked to continue exercising for up to 15 minutes or for as long as you can.

    At regular intervals, you will be asked how you are feeling. Please inform the team if you feel chest, arm or jaw pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, feel lightheaded or if you have any other unusual symptoms. The ECG monitor will be closely watched for any signs of stress on the heart indicating that the test should be stopped.

    After the test, you will walk slowly for a few minutes to cool down. Your heart rate and blood pressure will continue to be monitored until the levels are returned to normal.

  • An echocardiogram is a non-invasive procedure that uses sound waves (ultrasound) to produce images of the heart, which are used to evaluate how well the heart is working.

    The images created help your cardiologist to diagnose more accurately any issues with the valves or chambers of your heart.

    The procedure:

    The procedure will usually take between 20-30 minutes.

    You will be asked to remove all clothing from the waist up and you will be provided with a gown. The test is performed lying on your left side on a couch. During the procedure a gel is applied to the chest and the ultrasound probe (transducer) glides over the gel. The physiologist records images of the internal structures of the heart from various areas on your chest. You may be asked to hold your breath momentarily to improve the picture quality.

    A number of factors are evaluated such as:

    • Size of the heart
    • Pumping strength of the heart
    • Ability of heart to send blood throughout the body
    • Heart muscle condition
    • Heart valves
Contact Details
How to find us

Ground floor, main hospital